Research into Conventions of a Script

So that Emelia and I could create a realistic and professional looking script, we looked into the codes and conventions of a script/screenplay. Here is what Emelia found…

In order to have the best possible script we decided to research the codes and conventions of a professional script. We found the website writersstore.com extremely helpful in learning the format of a script because it clearly shows how everything should be later out and what everything means.
However, when we first tried to write a script we didn’t particularly research because we thought that it wouldn’t be as important as some other things that we had to do. This led to a terrible first version of the script that included nothing but dialogue. When we asked people about this the overall feedback was that it was confusing and they didn’t understand what was going in with the story.
After that feedback we decided to try again and make it a bit more complicated. We researched film scripts and looked at a few real life scripts from movies that we had seen and so we decided to try and mimic these as much as possible. These were better and people understood them more but it still didn’t look like we had made a film script. So we decided that version 2 wasn’t as good as it could be so we decided to do further research about exactly how film scripts are made.
We spent a long time looking at different diagrams that showed what scripts should look like but we couldn’t really replicate it. Then we discovered a website called WriterDuet in which we can both be on different computers and collaborate with each other on the script. Not only did this make it easier but WriterDuet also has features that make it much easier to write a professional screenplay and so we decided to use this. Along with the information from writersstore.com we think we successfully researched all the codes and conventions of a script and we are happy with the way our screenplay turned out.

“Codes and Conventions Of A Screenplay:
Dialogue, what the characters say is the main aspect of the script, must be exact

Stage directions, must be short and concise and will tell the actors exactly what their character is doing

Order, the script must start with a title, then an explanation of the scene, then a brief summary of the characters

Enter/Exit, all entrances and exits must be clearly shown

INT/EXT, stand for interior and exterior, they show where the scene is taking place, inside or outside

They are just a few of the main things we learned in our research about the conventions of a script.”

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