Tag Archives: Location

New Location…

Due to the limited time frame, Emelia and I do not have enough time to organise a fixed new location. Although my friend Hattie, whose house we had initially wanted to film at, offered her house to be the location, she could not do a day that Emelia and I could. Because of this, and the problem that we experienced before where we felt too awkward and so rushed our filming, Emelia and I decided to film at my house. It is fairly open, has many windows and would mean that we are in complete control of what is happening. My house is also a 10-15 minute walk away from Tom and Rosie’s house and has a bus directly from Emelia’s house to mine and so is not difficult to get to. Although my house may not have the country house interior decor that we had originally hoped for, we have a fairly large garden and can easily access a field. I intend to use a spare room in my house as Rosie’s bedroom in the opening as this room looks onto the garden and could easily be decorated with toys and teddies to look like a young girl’s bedroom. Here is a video to show the planned route for Rosie when filming…

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Changes That We Are Going To Make…

In order to improve upon our original film, Emelia and I are going to have to make various changes within our filming.

Firstly, we are altering our storyline. We shall now begin with the young girl waking up and then looking outside of her bedroom window into the icy, isolated film. After this, we shall no longer see her playing with her toys but shall see her go straight towards the stairs. She shall then go downstairs and make breakfast in bed for her Mum. After this, she shall go back upstairs holding the breakfast in bed and go into her Mother’s room. However, when entering the room she shall see that her Mum is not longer in bed. Confused, she shall go downstairs looking for her Mother on the way. When she can not find her, she shall go towards the back door and put on her Wellington Boots. After this, she shall go outside in search of her Mum. We shall then cut to the icy and isolated field and show the young girl walking. After this, we shall show the dead body and tilt upwards to reveal the young girl staring down at her dead Mother and then tilt even further to reveal the title of the film… that we have still not decided upon! We have decided to change the storyline because we wanted to cut out the awkwardness of her playing with her toys. We also think that this makes much more sense and highlights her innocence as she makes her Mum breakfast in bed. We are also no longer showing the mysterious man lingering over the young girl. We have made this decision as the footage that we are making is only the two minute opening and so you do not want to give too much away!

The second major difference to our film opening will be the location. Although we have not decided for definite yet, we know that we have to change location as the previous location is no longer available. However, even if it was I doubt that Emelia and I would film there again as it was awkward, dark and pushed us to rush our filming. We need to film in a space that we have complete control over. The space must also be light and open planned. Because of this, it is most probable that we will film at my own house!

We also intend to film the majority of the opening on the professional cameras as this will give off a much better quality. In order to achieve this, I have ordered two new SD Cards and will check that they work before we begin filming. We plan to film all of the opening on the camera, except from the last shot as we can not attach the expensive cameras to the wheel of a bike!

Although Emelia and I have considered various new additions to our storyline and filming technique, we have also planned to keep various aspects the same. For example, Emelia and I plan to use Rosie Scullion as our main character and will include a dead body! Hopefully, Emelia and I can pull off our reshoot and can reach our high expectations…

 

Production Log – 28th of December

Today is the day! Last night I charged up all of the equipment and checked it all over to make sure that it was all working. I then wiped my SD card so that we could have the full storage space just for our film opening. By this morning, all of the equipment was charged up and ready to go. At around 11am, I made my way to Tom Scullion’s house with all of the equipment, the storyboards, chargers, ribbon for Rosie’s hair plus much more. By the time I arrived, Emelia had also just arrived. We then went through with Rosie’s mum exactly what it was that we needed Rosie to do. After this, we asked Rosie to pick out a couple of her favourite toys and to find her Wellington Boots. We then set off for Tom’s Grandma’s house. Upon arrival, we could tell that Rosie was not going to be shy with her acting! After we had set up all of the equipment, we watched through our animated storyboards. We then decorated the designated room with all of Rosie’s favourite toys so that the room would look more like a young girl’s bedroom. After this, I did Rosie’s hair for her into two high bunchies and tied them off with a ribbon. Not only did this hairstyle exaggerate the stereotype for a young girl, but it kept her hair in place throughout filming. We were now ready to begin filming. At first, I was on camera whilst Emelia did sound. We also asked Tom to do the clapperboard. After filming Rosie getting out of bed, looking out of the window, playing with her toys (very awkwardly) and exiting the room from many angles we moved onto the stairs. The staircase at Tom’s Grandma’s house was fairly spacious which allowed us to film from various angles. It was at this point when the storage on the SD card showed to be full. Confused as to why this was, considering I thought I had wiped the card the night before, we turned to using my iPhone on a tripod. After filming various actions in the kitchen and back upstairs again, Emelia noticed that the light on the sound recorder hadn’t been coming on. Although this worried us, the recorder displayed on the screen that it was recording and so we carried on. After filming Rosie looking around the house for her mother, it was time to go outside. For this shot, Emelia and I wanted to use the dolly. After initial confusion when setting it up, we were once again ready to film Rosie. Firstly we filmed her walking out into the garden and then cut to her walking in a field. Although the continuity of this wasn’t fantastic, it was the best that we could do considering the circumstances with the location! It was after this when Emelia and I noticed that hardly any time had passed. We were rushing our filming as the atmosphere was extremely awkward filming at our friend’s Grandma’s house. Emelia and I felt slightly uncomfortable and also guilty for being loud and filming around her house and so decided to finish here with intentions to film the outside scenes another day. In our next lesson, Emelia and I will upload our footage and sound and will start editing!

Location Planning

The next stage in planning was for Emelia and I to find a location to film at. Originally, we envisaged filming at an isolated, country farm house. We wanted to film here as we thought it fit in well with our storyline. We then ran our survey and included a question to do with the location. Here is what we found from the survey…

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From our survey, we are certain that we would like to film in an isolated and rural area, preferably in a farmhouse. One of my close friends, Hattie, lives on a farm close to where Emelia lives. Her house is very large and includes stereotypical farmhouse interior decor. Emelia and I thought that this would be the perfect for our film and so planned on asking Hattie if we could come round to film for a day. The next time I saw Hattie, I asked whether it would be okay for us to film at her house or not. I asked in advance so we could plan our screenplay and storyboards based on her house. She said that it would be fine and that could go round to her house for a full day. This was perfect and Emelia and I were excited to film at her house. However, a couple of weeks later, I received a message from Hattie saying that she was going to Dorset on the day that we would be filming. Because i had already booked out the equipment for this day only, we had to find a new location to film at…

As we were pushed for time, Emelia and I were stressfully trying to find a new location to film at. We were messaging friends who lived on farms, but due to the late notice many couldn’t help us. We then asked Tom Scullion whether we could film at his house as there is a large field close to it. He then replied saying yes and asked whether or not we would prefer to film at his Grandma’s house as she has the large field right behind her house. We agreed that this would work better and so had a new location to film at! The field behind her house is large and isolated, just what we were hoping for. After all of the stress, Emelia and I were once again happy with our location.

Research Into Storyboards…

The next step in our pre production section of the coursework is to create a full set of storyboards. This aspect of the process is arguably one of the most important parts as it helps us to clearly and accurately map out our film openings. It will most probably be at this point when we decide whether to stick with our original plan, or to start from scratch. The storyboards will also prove to be hugely useful when we begin to film because we can use them as a set of instructions on how to set up the scene and where to position the camera. By following the plan of the screenplay and storyboards, hopefully our filming process will be much easier and more efficient with the best outcome possible. In order to create realistic, accurate and ultimately useful storyboards I have researched into the codes and conventions of a professional storyboard…

Although I had a vague idea as to what a storyboard was, my understanding was fairly limited. Because of this, the first thing that I decided to research was… What ACTUALLY is a storyboard? From a brief search on Google, I found that a storyboard is “a sequence of drawings, typically with some directions and dialogue, representing the shots planned for a film or television production.” From this definition, I learnt that the drawings themselves would have to be drawn in order to display the specific camera shot and composition of the shot. From previous experiences with storyboards, I simply sketched the images in a chronological order in order to display the storyline of the video. I also noted that directions and dialogue would need to be included in our storyboards. Although I gained the main points from this definition, I thought it be best to research deeper into the conventions of a storyboard…

Here are a few of the legitimate storyboards drawn for Disney’s ‘Lion King’ released in October 1994…

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Conventions of professional storyboards… 

  • Film Aspect Ratios – As storyboards are used in order to plan what the audience will see when watching the film, the size of the boxes must match the size of the screen. By matching these sizes, the storyboards can be more accurate as planning of positioning and angles can be made considering the space that would be given in real life. Some common ratios used in film are 1:1.85 and 1:2.2.
  • Camera Angles – It is important to include the camera angles going to be used in reality when planning storyboards as when filming, the storyboards can be used as a prompt and visual aid in setting up the shot. By displaying all camera shots on the paper before filming, the variety and range can also be planned efficiently. Without planning the angles, it could be argued that storyboards would be almost useless. Camera angles may include long shots, close ups and down shots.
  • Camera Movement – Planning the movement of the camera before actually filming allows you to get a sense of the film and how it will flow and work together. By planning movement in advance, rules such as the ‘180 Degree Rule’ can be put into place more efficiently.  Some movements may involve pans, tilts and zooms.
  • Location – The location of a shot can be planned in advance by using storyboards. Not only this, but mies-en-scene within this shot such as positions of props can also be planned out earlier and moved around if not aesthetically pleasing.
  • Characters – The specific characters, their positions and actions can be displayed within a set of storyboards. By having a visual aid, the director’s of the film will be able to see the aesthetics of the shot and be able to alter them if not pleasing to the eye.
  • Sound – Important sounds, including both diegetic and non-diegetic, must be noted onto the storyboards.By planning this out before, you will get more of an understanding as to when what sounds are expected and when.
  • Timing – The length of each shot must be noted on the storyboards. Typically, this is noted in the top corner of each individual box. By planning out the timing, you can easily assess the flow of the film.

After researching the many conventions that are necessary when creating storyboards I was fairly overwhelmed as had not considered many of these before. However, now that Emelia and I have the knowledge of these conventions, we plan to use them when creating our own storyboards for our film opening. In doing so, we hope that our storyboards will be to as much use as possible in future aspects of the task such as filming and editing.