Tag Archives: Research

Red State Research…

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Here is a video of the speech made by Kevin Smith…

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Research Into Fonts

Emelia and I decided to research into what sort of fonts are often used in film production. Here is a short blog post that Emelia wrote about the fonts often seen in horror film openings and why we chose the fonts that we did…

“We decided to research what fonts would be best suited for the opening title sequence of our film. We feel as though this is really important because it can be the reason for a film looking professional or not. For example we wouldn’t want to use Comic Sans as this would just look completely unprofessional.

We started our research by looking at other films title sequences and seeing what type of font they were using. We noticed that a lot of thriller films often use square looking letters that are only slightly noticeably tall and thin. We decided to use a font like this for our credits. We chose to have the credits quite small and in the centre of the screen because it looked much more dramatic and realistic that way.

For the idents we used much bolder fonts because we felt like they could seem more creative than the credits. For Lucent Pictures we just chose a large square looking font because it is similar to what other idents of that genre are like, for example Ghost House and Blumhouse. However for our Orchid House Productions ident we thought that the font could look a bit more eccentric because the ident itself was much more colourful than the rest of the film. So for this one we used a curly font to make it look much more extravagant and I think it matched quite well with the pink glow of the orchid.”

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Research Into Makeup

Due to the fact that our actress for the mother character is not age specific, Emelia and I decided that we needed to focus heavily on the makeup and physical appearance of the character. In order to make it believable that the mother was in fact a mother and in fact deceased, I needed to research into techniques of makeup in this field. Emelia and I plan to keep the makeup of the mother fairly natural as she would have been relaxing or sleeping at the time of the kidnapping. However, we feel as though she should be wearing some makeup in order to make her seem older and also in order to emphasise stereotypes such as long eye lashes making a girl more girly. On the other hand, Emelia and I thought it be best to add a grey/white pale tone to the mother character to show that she has been killed and has been lying in a freezing cold field for a substantial matter of time. In order to master this makeup, I will research into tutorial videos and then try it out on myself! The first video I watched displayed clearly how to use makeup in order to make you seem older…

Although the video aims for the girl to look 21, some points made in the video explain how makeup can make you look a lot older than you are. The next video I watched showed how to create a corpse using makeup. The end result is so believable!

Sally has agreed to let me do her makeup and hair on the day of filming. After quite a bit of thought and asking many friends which hairstyle they think would best represent a mother figure and make Sally look older, I have decided to create a low, casual, messy bun. The hairstyle that I envisage will look something similar to the hair in this tutorial…

I shall keep these tutorials in mind when doing Sally’s makeup and hair on the day of filming.

Research Into Storyboards…

The next step in our pre production section of the coursework is to create a full set of storyboards. This aspect of the process is arguably one of the most important parts as it helps us to clearly and accurately map out our film openings. It will most probably be at this point when we decide whether to stick with our original plan, or to start from scratch. The storyboards will also prove to be hugely useful when we begin to film because we can use them as a set of instructions on how to set up the scene and where to position the camera. By following the plan of the screenplay and storyboards, hopefully our filming process will be much easier and more efficient with the best outcome possible. In order to create realistic, accurate and ultimately useful storyboards I have researched into the codes and conventions of a professional storyboard…

Although I had a vague idea as to what a storyboard was, my understanding was fairly limited. Because of this, the first thing that I decided to research was… What ACTUALLY is a storyboard? From a brief search on Google, I found that a storyboard is “a sequence of drawings, typically with some directions and dialogue, representing the shots planned for a film or television production.” From this definition, I learnt that the drawings themselves would have to be drawn in order to display the specific camera shot and composition of the shot. From previous experiences with storyboards, I simply sketched the images in a chronological order in order to display the storyline of the video. I also noted that directions and dialogue would need to be included in our storyboards. Although I gained the main points from this definition, I thought it be best to research deeper into the conventions of a storyboard…

Here are a few of the legitimate storyboards drawn for Disney’s ‘Lion King’ released in October 1994…

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Conventions of professional storyboards… 

  • Film Aspect Ratios – As storyboards are used in order to plan what the audience will see when watching the film, the size of the boxes must match the size of the screen. By matching these sizes, the storyboards can be more accurate as planning of positioning and angles can be made considering the space that would be given in real life. Some common ratios used in film are 1:1.85 and 1:2.2.
  • Camera Angles – It is important to include the camera angles going to be used in reality when planning storyboards as when filming, the storyboards can be used as a prompt and visual aid in setting up the shot. By displaying all camera shots on the paper before filming, the variety and range can also be planned efficiently. Without planning the angles, it could be argued that storyboards would be almost useless. Camera angles may include long shots, close ups and down shots.
  • Camera Movement – Planning the movement of the camera before actually filming allows you to get a sense of the film and how it will flow and work together. By planning movement in advance, rules such as the ‘180 Degree Rule’ can be put into place more efficiently.  Some movements may involve pans, tilts and zooms.
  • Location – The location of a shot can be planned in advance by using storyboards. Not only this, but mies-en-scene within this shot such as positions of props can also be planned out earlier and moved around if not aesthetically pleasing.
  • Characters – The specific characters, their positions and actions can be displayed within a set of storyboards. By having a visual aid, the director’s of the film will be able to see the aesthetics of the shot and be able to alter them if not pleasing to the eye.
  • Sound – Important sounds, including both diegetic and non-diegetic, must be noted onto the storyboards.By planning this out before, you will get more of an understanding as to when what sounds are expected and when.
  • Timing – The length of each shot must be noted on the storyboards. Typically, this is noted in the top corner of each individual box. By planning out the timing, you can easily assess the flow of the film.

After researching the many conventions that are necessary when creating storyboards I was fairly overwhelmed as had not considered many of these before. However, now that Emelia and I have the knowledge of these conventions, we plan to use them when creating our own storyboards for our film opening. In doing so, we hope that our storyboards will be to as much use as possible in future aspects of the task such as filming and editing.

Research into Conventions of a Script

So that Emelia and I could create a realistic and professional looking script, we looked into the codes and conventions of a script/screenplay. Here is what Emelia found…

In order to have the best possible script we decided to research the codes and conventions of a professional script. We found the website writersstore.com extremely helpful in learning the format of a script because it clearly shows how everything should be later out and what everything means.
However, when we first tried to write a script we didn’t particularly research because we thought that it wouldn’t be as important as some other things that we had to do. This led to a terrible first version of the script that included nothing but dialogue. When we asked people about this the overall feedback was that it was confusing and they didn’t understand what was going in with the story.
After that feedback we decided to try again and make it a bit more complicated. We researched film scripts and looked at a few real life scripts from movies that we had seen and so we decided to try and mimic these as much as possible. These were better and people understood them more but it still didn’t look like we had made a film script. So we decided that version 2 wasn’t as good as it could be so we decided to do further research about exactly how film scripts are made.
We spent a long time looking at different diagrams that showed what scripts should look like but we couldn’t really replicate it. Then we discovered a website called WriterDuet in which we can both be on different computers and collaborate with each other on the script. Not only did this make it easier but WriterDuet also has features that make it much easier to write a professional screenplay and so we decided to use this. Along with the information from writersstore.com we think we successfully researched all the codes and conventions of a script and we are happy with the way our screenplay turned out.

“Codes and Conventions Of A Screenplay:
Dialogue, what the characters say is the main aspect of the script, must be exact

Stage directions, must be short and concise and will tell the actors exactly what their character is doing

Order, the script must start with a title, then an explanation of the scene, then a brief summary of the characters

Enter/Exit, all entrances and exits must be clearly shown

INT/EXT, stand for interior and exterior, they show where the scene is taking place, inside or outside

They are just a few of the main things we learned in our research about the conventions of a script.”