Tag Archives: Storyboard

Opinions On Animated Storyboards…

Emelia and I were happy with our animated storyboards because to us, it all made sense and we felt as though the flow was fairly decent for a film within the genre of a thriller. However, we began to wonder whether or not our animated storyboard and, ultimately, plot for our opening made sense to other. Because of these queries, we decided that it would be best to show our animated video to family and friends and note their viewpoints and opinions.

Firstly, we asked for opinions surrounding the pace of our 2 minute opening. From asking, we received varying answers. However, on the whole most people agreed that what we had was a believable pace for a thriller film. When we asked why they thought this, the majority of replies said that it was because “it helped to give a creepy or foreboding atmosphere” (Sally, 16). In complete comparison to this, some people said that the pace gave an almost “safe” atmosphere. Although at first rather baffled by the huge contrast between the two opinions, Emelia and I were not too worried as both of these opinions could work to our advantage. For example, the “creepy or foreboding atmosphere” could work to our advantage as it would help our film opening of it within our desired genre, thriller. On the other hand, the “safe” atmosphere could work to our advantage as the setting and location of our opening is meant to give off this feeling at first in lead up to the shock and twist at the end.

We then asked our family and friends whether or not they understood the plot of our film because we felt as though it only made sense to us as we know the background of each frame. The majority of people said that they understood what was going on throughout the scene and understood the movement and actions of the character completely. However, others mentioned that they were confused whether there was one or two young girls. When asking them why they thought this, it was clear to Emelia and I that the source of the confusion was due to the fact that the two of us have varying drawing technique and did not draw the young girl exactly the same as each other. This is something that we would consider changing if we were to re draw these storyboards, however as a whole we are happy with this feedback as we were extremely worried as to people would be able to tell what had been drawn because of the fact that neither of us are the most amazing of artists.

Overall, Emelia and I are happy with the feedback that we have received from our friends and family. We are now excited to use the animation when filming as we believe that it will be extremely useful in the chaos of it all!

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Final Storyboards…

Emelia and I spent a fair deal of time on completing our storyboards. However, we felt as though the storyboards were an important aspect of the planning as they would be so much help in future aspects of making our film opening. Although the continuity of our storyboards is not fantastic due to the fact that the split up the task between the two of us, we are happy with the flow of our film and can clearly picture the end product in our heads. Emelia and I are not the most talented of artists and so some drawings may not make as much sense to others as they do to us; however, we do not think that this is a huge problem as it is us who needs to understand the planning of the shot. If we were to have more time, I would be tempted to create a set of storyboards online using software such as http://www.storyboardthat.com where you can create a cartoon version of your storyboards. Emelia and I also did not include as much detail within the frames as we maybe should have done; however, once again we did not view this as hugely important as we are not 100% sure of these details now anyway and so the shot would be inaccurate. Overall, we are fairly pleased with our storyboards.

In order to be able to visualise the flow of our film opening to the maximum extent, we decided to animate the storyboards. To do this, I had to take individual shots of each frame. I then imported these onto iMovie and ordered them correctly. I then had to consider the timings and shorten/lengthen the shots until I was happy with the outcome. Emelia and I thought that the animation would be more useful if it was simply of the drawing itself rather than including the writing and dialogue etc into the animation. We decided this as then you can focus more on what is occurring in each shot. Now that we have an animated video of our storyboard, we can use this to our advantage and plan to bring the video with us when filming. We plan to do this as we believe that it will help us to concentrate on the flow, stay efficient and eliminate mistakes surrounding rules such as the ‘180 Degree Rule’. Here is our animated film of our storyboards…

 

Coloured Storyboards…

Now that Emelia and I had each box on our storyboards planned out, we could begin sketching the storyboards for our film opening. We jumped straight in as we had lots to do. At first, Emelia and I decided to do fairly rough sketches for each box so that we could assess the various shots and movements and easily edit and change them to our desire. After a brief discussion, Emelia and I decided to use colour in our storyboards as we felt that this would help us to picture how the shots would look in real life. However, after little time passed we soon noticed that colour added nothing to our sketches. We had not yet planned the specific mise en scene of our shots and so using colour seemed to be just wasting our valuable time and adding nothing. It was then that we researched deeper into other examples of storyboards. Here is an example of one of Emelia’s coloured sets of rough drawings…

  • Firstly, we came across some storyboards for the ‘Star Wars‘ films, drawn by  Joe Johnston…movie_storyboards_star_wars_1.jpgmovie_storyboards_star_wars_2.jpgmovie_storyboards_star_wars_3.jpg
  • After that, we came across storyboards from the ‘Jurassic Park‘ films, drawn by David Lowery…movie_storyboards_jurassic_park1.jpg
  • Next, we came across the storyboards for ‘Forrest Gump‘, drawn by Chris Bonura…movie_storyboards_forrest_gump.jpg

From finding these various storyboards from famous films that we both know well, Emelia and I noticed that almost all of the examples of a storyboard that we found were in black and white. The remaining storyboards were drawn using either one colour whilst using the various tones to distinguish light and dark, or dull colours such as brown and beige. After finding this, Emelia and I decided to start our storyboards again but to use black and white this time. We also decided to use varying tone in order to display the depths in our drawings.

Research Into Storyboards…

The next step in our pre production section of the coursework is to create a full set of storyboards. This aspect of the process is arguably one of the most important parts as it helps us to clearly and accurately map out our film openings. It will most probably be at this point when we decide whether to stick with our original plan, or to start from scratch. The storyboards will also prove to be hugely useful when we begin to film because we can use them as a set of instructions on how to set up the scene and where to position the camera. By following the plan of the screenplay and storyboards, hopefully our filming process will be much easier and more efficient with the best outcome possible. In order to create realistic, accurate and ultimately useful storyboards I have researched into the codes and conventions of a professional storyboard…

Although I had a vague idea as to what a storyboard was, my understanding was fairly limited. Because of this, the first thing that I decided to research was… What ACTUALLY is a storyboard? From a brief search on Google, I found that a storyboard is “a sequence of drawings, typically with some directions and dialogue, representing the shots planned for a film or television production.” From this definition, I learnt that the drawings themselves would have to be drawn in order to display the specific camera shot and composition of the shot. From previous experiences with storyboards, I simply sketched the images in a chronological order in order to display the storyline of the video. I also noted that directions and dialogue would need to be included in our storyboards. Although I gained the main points from this definition, I thought it be best to research deeper into the conventions of a storyboard…

Here are a few of the legitimate storyboards drawn for Disney’s ‘Lion King’ released in October 1994…

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Conventions of professional storyboards… 

  • Film Aspect Ratios – As storyboards are used in order to plan what the audience will see when watching the film, the size of the boxes must match the size of the screen. By matching these sizes, the storyboards can be more accurate as planning of positioning and angles can be made considering the space that would be given in real life. Some common ratios used in film are 1:1.85 and 1:2.2.
  • Camera Angles – It is important to include the camera angles going to be used in reality when planning storyboards as when filming, the storyboards can be used as a prompt and visual aid in setting up the shot. By displaying all camera shots on the paper before filming, the variety and range can also be planned efficiently. Without planning the angles, it could be argued that storyboards would be almost useless. Camera angles may include long shots, close ups and down shots.
  • Camera Movement – Planning the movement of the camera before actually filming allows you to get a sense of the film and how it will flow and work together. By planning movement in advance, rules such as the ‘180 Degree Rule’ can be put into place more efficiently.  Some movements may involve pans, tilts and zooms.
  • Location – The location of a shot can be planned in advance by using storyboards. Not only this, but mies-en-scene within this shot such as positions of props can also be planned out earlier and moved around if not aesthetically pleasing.
  • Characters – The specific characters, their positions and actions can be displayed within a set of storyboards. By having a visual aid, the director’s of the film will be able to see the aesthetics of the shot and be able to alter them if not pleasing to the eye.
  • Sound – Important sounds, including both diegetic and non-diegetic, must be noted onto the storyboards.By planning this out before, you will get more of an understanding as to when what sounds are expected and when.
  • Timing – The length of each shot must be noted on the storyboards. Typically, this is noted in the top corner of each individual box. By planning out the timing, you can easily assess the flow of the film.

After researching the many conventions that are necessary when creating storyboards I was fairly overwhelmed as had not considered many of these before. However, now that Emelia and I have the knowledge of these conventions, we plan to use them when creating our own storyboards for our film opening. In doing so, we hope that our storyboards will be to as much use as possible in future aspects of the task such as filming and editing.

Storyboard Planning…

When sitting down to begin drawing our storyboards, Emelia and I were unsure on the various shots that we wanted to use and the flow of our film. In order to come over this and to get a more general view into the various shots in our opening, Emelia and I decided to plan out each storyboard square before beginning to draw. Also, this meant that Emelia and I could split the storyboards up between us knowing exactly what we had to do. We chose to split up the task so that we could carry on with the process faster whilst having highly detailed storyboards. When planning what would be in each shot, Emelia and I had to consider the types of shots often seen in thriller films. We also had to consider the range of our shots. For example, continuous use of long shots would distance the viewers from the film as it may seem more unrealistic and boring. Once Emelia and I had finished planning out our shots, we split them between us and began our sketching. However, it was rather tedious bringing in the many A3 sheets into school and we also often found ourselves struggling to find the correct sheet! Because of this, I decided to animate the plan in a short video as this would be easy for us to access and also allowed us to visualise the flow and movement of the film. Here is the animation of our storyboard plan…

Foundation Portfolio in Media

We have recently been introduced to our task for our coursework. This coursework will count for 50% of our overall AS mark. Our task is to “create the titles and opening of a new fiction film to last a maximum of two minutes”. For this aspect to the course, we will be working in twos. I am working with Emelia Rodgers as we get along, work well together and enjoyed working together at GCSE. In order to earn the highest mark that we can, there is going to be a lot of work put into this task. The planning work put into the task fits into the ‘Pre-Production’ category of the project. In todays lesson we went through the various aspects that we will need to include in our pre production planning. There is a lot to think about including…

Form: Firstly we will need to research the form of film openings in order to understand what the task is exactly asking of us. To complete this, we will research the common conventions in existing film openings. Then, we shall watch a few openings and plot the timeline in order to get a sense of what is expected and how to structure it. For example, how much actual film footage to include, how to relate the beginning to the plot of the entire film and of course the various aspects such as idents needed in every film opening.

Genre: Next, we need to search our options. We will look into the many genres out there and choose our favourite. In order to choose successfully, we need to understand the genre features to each. We will also need to know what an audience expects when watching a certain genre in order to base our film around that in attempt to make it as interesting and realistic as possible.

Idea: Once we have our chosen genre, we will need to think of an idea for our film. In order to plan the opening, we will need to plot an entire film. We will also need to come up with a title for our film in this section of the pre production.

Pitch: When we have chosen our genre and come up with an idea/plot we will need to begin the process of creating a pitch. In order to create a professional script, we will need to research the conventions to a pitch. We shall then write the script to a time limit of 30 seconds. We shall then rehearse our pitch so that it will seem thought out, convincing and professional when sharing it with our class, teachers and camera. From this, we will receive feedback, criticism and advice from others in an attempt to perfect our final idea so that we can then move onto the next step…

Script: The next step in the process is to produce a script for our 2 minute opening. We can not, however, just note down what we would like our characters to say. In order to complete this aspect to the highest standard, we will need to once again research the codes and conventions of a genuine, professional script. Once we have produced our script, we will have a read through and receive progressive feedback in order to get it as perfect as we can.

Storyboards: After writing our scripts, we will move onto creating storyboards. First, we will need to (once again) research the codes and conventions to a professional set of storyboards. We shall then hand draw our own set in as much detail as possible. After this, we will find an alternative way of creating storyboards in order to create an animated version. We shall then show these copies to others in order to receive some constructive feedback.

Branding: In order to complete the task successfully, we will need to create everything shown in the film. This includes the logos and idents of companies shown at the beginning. We will use a software called “Motion” for the first time and attempt to create a set of logos and idents to use in our opening in order to make it seem as realistic as possible.

Practical Preparations: The final stage to our pre production preparations are to make sure we have everything ready for filming. We will have to contact and organise some actors and various locations to film in. We will also need to practise the makeup and hair for the film as well as organising costumes and a filming schedule. On top of this, we will have to make sure that we know how to work the equipment properly and organise using it for filming.

Once we have completed all of the pre production work, we will be ready to film. We have been given the Christmas holidays to film footage for our film so that we can begin editing when we return.